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The ehouse experiment

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This weekend retreat sits majestically amongst Redwood trees and Kanuka. The Blackclad rain screen helps sit the contemporary structure amongst its Kanuka setting. The finish is ‘The Scrub’ option and has three widths fixed in a random format. 

This weekend retreat was a long but amazing process. From the first phase of establishing the site to the last phase, airlifting the water tank, wall cladding and roof cladding to the island. 

If you're interested in how this retreat became what it is today, watch the full 7 part series which shows all of the steps taken. - Here


If you would like to know more information about 'The Scrub' finish please visit Black Clad


Posted: May 14, 2017 Expand this story
Habitat Build - Nepal 2016

Habitat Build - Nepal 2016 read more »

Follow Phil and his Habitat for Humanity team around Nepal while the build a house for a well deserving family within 8 days. 

The habitat team used mostly natural resources such as bamboo for the frame. Dung, mud and straw to act as the plaster to build this house.

Helping a well deserving family through tough times is a gratifying feeling. 

If you wish to help next time, please head over to the Habitat for Humanity page and sign up. 

http://www.habitat.org.nz/

If you do not live in New Zealand and wish to volunteer there are Habitat for Humanity located over the globe, so please get into contact with them. 


Posted: Feb. 11, 2017 Expand this story
The ehouse experiment - Part 7

The ehouse experiment - Part 7 read more »

This video is how the water tank, wall cladding and roof cladding were delivered to Kawau Island. 

Posted: Feb. 11, 2017 Expand this story
The ehouse experiment - Part 6

The ehouse experiment - Part 6 read more »

Phase 3 is complete. Next phase is the timber framing.

Posted: Nov. 9, 2016 Expand this story

The ehouse experiment - Part 5

The ehouse experiment - Part 5 read more »

Drone footage of the earthworks, retaining walls and foundation piles. Phase three will get underway shortly with the assembly of all the sub-floor structure.

Posted: Aug. 12, 2016 Expand this story

The ehouse experiment - Part 4

The ehouse experiment - Part 4 read more »

Drone footage of the earthworks, retaining walls and foundation piles. Phase three will get underway shortly with the assembly of all the sub-floor structure.

Posted: June 19, 2016 Expand this story

The ehouse experiment - Part 3

The ehouse experiment - Part 3 read more »

While the builders are on site busily erecting the sub-floor structure, the exterior rain screen is being pre-finished. The rain screen is Larch and is finished using a technique called Shou Sugi Ban, an ancient Japanese technique of charring the wood. The benefits of this type of finish are that there is no maintenance, insects don't like it, moss and mould doesn't like it. You get a beautiful sheen to the wood as opposed to the flat dull finish of using a wood stain.

Posted: June 5, 2016 Expand this story

The ehouse experiment - Part 2

The ehouse experiment - Part 2 read more »

Phase two is complete comprising of the earthworks, retaining walls and foundation piles. Phase three will get underway shortly with the assembly of all the sub-floor structure.


Posted: June 5, 2016 Expand this story

The ehouse experiment - Part 1

The ehouse experiment - Part 1 read more »

Work is underway on site for what we are calling the ehouse experiment. This project is perhaps an experiment in implementing new to New Zealand building techniques.


The weekend retreat incorporates a range of different things like:

alternate timber framing techniques to significantly reduce thermally bridging, a composite timber floor system and burnt Larch rain screens.


Posted: June 5, 2016 Expand this story

Recycled Spanish Cathedral

Elderly Madrid Man Builds Incredible Spanish Cathedral Entirely From Trash read more »

While the cathedral’s design is loosely based on St. Peter’s Cathedral, Don Justo has created no formal drawings or engineering plans. His background in farming did not stop him from taking on such a challenging project, which incorporates motifs found in castles, churches, and even the White House. Most of the bricks are salvaged from nearby brick factories, and cathedral’s walls are certainly unorthodox.

After leaving life as a farmer to become a Benedictine Monk, Don Justo came down with tuberculosis which forced him out of the monastery in a greatly weakened state. He promised himself that if he survived he would erect a church dedicated to the Lady of The Pillar who he prayed to during that turbulent time.


Originally Blogged @ inhabitat

Posted: Jan. 28, 2014 Expand this story

Ehouse Kids Rooms

As part of the first ehouse project, the ehouse team gifted a makeover of the two childrens bedrooms. We came up with two themes, The 'Fairy encharted garden' for Stella (2 years) and 'Space' for Blake (5 years). read more »

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Posted: Jan. 28, 2014 Expand this story

ehouse timelapse....Move in day!

It has finally arrived, move in day for the client. Its all hands on deck as the last minute items are completed and the family move in. read more »

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Posted: Jan. 21, 2014 Expand this story

ehouse kitchen installation

Time lapse of the installation of the kitchen along with the construction of the plywood bench tops and other joinery/cabinetry. Our first ehouse, Waterview, Auckland read more »

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Posted: Jan. 21, 2014 Expand this story

HOME-2-0

NYIT students will help build a Prototype Shelter this Spring to test a Roof System that could help disaster victims around the world. read more »

Last week’s devastating typhoon in the Philippines has reminded designers of the ongoing challenge of creating safe, temporary shelters when natural disasters hit. Crates of food and water are some of the first types of aid delivered to these ravaged areas; so what if these resources could be designed to also provide shelter and minimize waste? The New York Institute of Technology’s School of Architecture asked just that question and came up with a solution: SodaBIB, a new type of shipping pallet that would allow commonly used plastic bottles to be used for shelter.


http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/257093720/home2o-roof-system-building-a-prototype-shelter


Posted: Nov. 18, 2013 Expand this story

Nomadic Furniture

Responding to society´s current and future needs born from modern culture, this project explores the potential of temporary furniture. Reducing comfort to the minimum in order to enlarge mobility to the maximum, Penadés encourage us to reconsider our ideas of contemporary furniture and give them new meanings in a more ephemeral context. read more »

How could this concept be implemented at a larger scale? The potential to create nomadic housing is one to explore. A tent is a great example to provide temporary shelter but could we develop this further?

Posted: Nov. 7, 2013 Expand this story

ehouse Roof Shout!

ehouse hit a significant milestone late in September. The roof has been completed and so the design team, contractors, suppliers and supporters came together to celebrate read more »

A great night was had by all and the general consensus was the home is looking fantastic.  Despite being a cold spring night, the home was cozy and warm, even with all the doors open!


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Posted: Oct. 2, 2013 Expand this story

ehouse timelapse-Flashings and cladding completion

The roof flashings, metal fascias and barges are all complete now and the building form and structure is really starting to show itself now. read more »

The roof flashings, metal fascias and barges are all complete now and the building form and structure is really starting to show itself now.

Posted: Oct. 2, 2013 Expand this story

Architecture+Women Exhibition - Glulam Installation

The theme of Architecture Week for 2013 is Architecture+Women, to mark the 120th anniversary of Women Suffrage in New Zealand read more »

The theme of Architecture Week for 2013 is Architecture+Women, to mark the 120th anniversary of Women Suffrage in New Zealand. The exhibition is being held at Silo Park in Auckland from 19th - 29th September 2013, and is intended to encourage discussion about the role of women in the architecture profession.

Several large glulam roof beams from a warehouse demolition in Manukau have been donated to the Architecture for Humanity Auckland Chapter, and are being re-used as the genesis for a variety of projects across the North Island of New Zealand. This installation forms the beams into three modules, defining the space in front of the Silo's, and encouraging public interaction. The beams are going to be recycled after the exhibition and used in the next series of glulam projects, and other components recycled where possible.

The Glulam Project team needed to work with the many constraints of the public site, and the physical properties of the donated glulam beams as the main building components. Therefore, the team formulated a construction methodology to work with tight construction timeframes, and which allowed the project team to do as much of the construction work as possible themselves. This video documents the logistics of the construction process, and the enjoyment and reward in producing the finished installation.

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SOURCE:http://www.architecturewomen.org.nz/archives/glulam-project-architecture-humanity

Posted: Sept. 26, 2013 Expand this story

Strawbale House by Min Hall

Straw bale is used in modern construction because of its excellent thermal properties and its low environmental impact. Straw is described as a renewable material. A renewable material is one that can be replaced by natural processes at a rate comparable or faster than its rate of consumption by humans, rather than a finite resource that is depleted through use. read more »

This little handmade building takes sustainability and passive solar principles seriously - it makes no compromises. The simple uncluttered space is used as sleepout, music room, meditation area and party space and sits in the garden with its back to the main house.

It is experimental, incorporating strawbales, locally sourced untreated Macrocarpa and Douglas Fir, Onduline roofing made from recycled cellulose, lime/sawdust/granite sand plaster and many recycled materials: hardwood posts, resawn oregon beams for window and door joinery, Victorian bargeboards, and the flat sections of broken terracotta roof tiles for the mosaic floor.

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SOURCE:http://www.minhall.co.nz/project_sleepout.html

Posted: Sept. 26, 2013 Expand this story

Roof Cladding and Joinery Installation

Roof Cladding and Joinery Installation read more »

Time lapse of the roof cladding and joinery installation, first ehouse, Waterview, Auckland

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Posted: Sept. 13, 2013 Expand this story

Cladding Timelapse

Cladding installation timelapse read more »

Time lapse of the cladding installation, first ehouse, Waterview, Auckland

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Posted: Sept. 13, 2013 Expand this story

Ehouse Roof Framing Time Lapse

Time lapse of the roof framing installation, first ehouse, Waterview, Auckland read more »

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Posted: Sept. 13, 2013 Expand this story

Hut on Sleds

Great example of compact living with smart use of natural materials with reused industrial fittings read more »

The ultimate motor home... "Hut on sleds" designed by CCC Architects is a small, simple, functional - and completely moveable 40 square meter hut. It rests on two thick wooden sleds that allow the home to be shifted around its beach-front location: A clever response to the ever changing landscape in this coastal erosion zone.

Posted: Aug. 21, 2013 Expand this story

Ehouse Wall Framing Time Lapse

Time lapse of wall framing going up on the first ehouse in Auckland read more »

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Posted: Aug. 21, 2013 Expand this story

Prefabricated Batch

Swedish designer creates a batch perfect for relocation read more »

Kitsets are given a bad rap (mostly warranted) but this small yet perfectly formed flat-packed home could change that.

It’s the brainchild of Swedish architect Jonas Wagell, who saw changes in building regulations as an opportunity to create a new home design. His prefabricated modular home, known as the Mini House, is 15m2 and comes with an outdoor terrace-cum-pergola of the same size. “The concept was developed as a response to new Swedish regulations allowing house owners to build a 15m2 house without a building permit,” explains Wagell. “Also the pergola is constructed with an airflow of 50 per cent, which makes it building permit free as well.”

Included in the Mini House are the walls, framing, roofing, trim-less windows, and an insulating polystyrene core clad with plywood or plastic laminate. The whole shebang comes flat-packed and can be put up in just two days, which makes it amazingly more efficient to build than a regular dwelling. No surprise, then, that the design has been incredibly popular with Swedes, who tend to put them up as summer houses.

To keep up with demand, Wagell is now collaborating with another Swedish studio, Sommarnöjen, on newer, bigger versions. The Mini House 2.0, which can be made as big as 70m2, will soon be for sale in Scandinavia. Next year, the houses will be for sale in Western Europe. But will they ever be available to Kiwis?” We will start to deliver to Scandinavia,” says Wagell, who has been overwhelmed by the response, “and then gradually expand from there!”.

REBLOGGED FROM URBIS

Posted: Aug. 21, 2013 Expand this story

Ehouse Time Lapse

Construction time lapse of our first ehouse read more »

First ehouse in Waterview Auckland


#1 time-lapse of construction progress


Foundation walls and Slab pour


Posted: Aug. 21, 2013 Expand this story

E3 flythrough

ehouse 3 animation read more »

Simplistic geometrical forms create contemporary public and privates spaces that are spatially defined. A traditional structure allows flexibility and adaptability.

Vibrant environments that encourage communication and nurtures family well being by providing resilient forms that reflect strength and longevity.

A creatively authentic and inspiring building that is truly smarter...

Posted: Aug. 21, 2013 Expand this story

E2 Flythrough

ehouse 2 animation read more »

ehouse™ is all about sustainable, eco design that doesn't sacrifice creature comforts or good looks to save the earth. 

That's the point of good design -- it finds the optimum balance between comfort, efficiency and elegant construction to create a home that is more comfortable, more efficient, better on the environment and still looks beautiful.


Posted: Aug. 21, 2013 Expand this story